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THE HISTORY OF LEITH
SOUTH LEITH PARISH CHURCH

 

Index

Genealogical Research

Walking Tours of Leith

Introduction
The Siege of Leith
Sir Andrew Wood
Mary Queen of Scots

Templar Treasure
Jealousy of Edinburgh

Civil War
Templars in Leith
Leith and the Holy Grail

Templars & Tau Cross
Morton & Witchcraft

South Leith Parish Church
Great Plague
Cromwell

Interactive Map

Links


 

 

Royal Connections

South Leith Church has had royal connections for over a thousand years indirectly and directly.  

The first provable royal link with South Leith Church is in 1327 with Robert the Bruce and possibly with William Wallace as well. According to court records Robert the Bruce came to Leith to receive treatment for Leprosy from the Knights of St John and that explains why the Knights of St John used the charter which they held from the time of Godfrey de Saulton. William Wallace wrote his famous letter to the burgers of Marleburg from Leith, to let them know it was safe to return to Scotland to Trade after the battle of Stirling Bridge.

It was also in Leith that James I became a key person in the founding of the Preceptory of St Anthony. However, his work was not completed due to him being murdered at Perth in 1437. It is of interest that the Logan family of Leith through Euphemia Ross who was a daughter of Robert II had Royal Connections. This gave South Leith Church the right to a royal coat of arms over the West door which has unfortunately been removed long ago.

In the church tower today can be seen the coats of arms of James VI of Scotland, I of England, Charles I and inside the tower can be seen the coats of arms of Mary de Guise and Mary Queen of Scots. This is the only place in Scotland where four consecutive coats of arms of a royal house can be seen. However, there is no proof that Mary Queen of Scots came to South Leith, the coat of arms is here due to the fact that it came from the old Tollbooth of Leith.


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